Foundation degree in the UK

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subject area
language
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university status  
Rhos-on-Sea, United Kingdom

3D Animation and Games

Language: English Studies in English
Subject area: arts
Kind of studies: full-time studies, part-time studies
University website: www.gllm.ac.uk
Foundation of Sciences (FdSc)
3D
3D or 3-D (usually an abbreviation of three-dimensional) may refer to:
Animation
Animation is a dynamic medium in which images or objects are manipulated to appear as moving images. In traditional animation, images are drawn or painted by hand on transparent celluloid sheets to be photographed and exhibited on film. Today most animations are made with computer-generated imagery (CGI). Computer animation can be very detailed 3D animation, while 2D computer animation can be used for stylistic reasons, low bandwidth or faster real-time renderings. Other common animation methods apply a stop motion technique to two and three-dimensional objects like paper cutouts, puppets or clay figures. The stop motion technique where live actors are used as a frame-by-frame subject is known as pixilation.
Animation
Work hard. That’s the thing that most people who love games and animation may not realize about what they’re seeing. It requires an ugly amount of work. You have to dedicate your life to it, but I believe almost anyone can learn how to make games and animate at a competent level. I don’t believe in following your dreams and going into too much fairy dust about the arts. Sure, it’s fun, but there are many times it’s not fun and you still have to do it.
Doug TenNapel, "A Conversation with ‘Armikrog’/‘Earthworm Jim’ creator Doug TenNapel", Ben Mitchell, Skwigly: Online Animation Magazine, 30 September 2015
Animation
Animation offers a medium of story telling and visual entertainment which can bring pleasure and information to people of all ages everywhere in the world.
Walt Disney as quoted in "COSI exhibit explores world of cartoons" by Jeffrey Zupanic in The Review (2 August 2007)
Animation
You have to make all the same decisions that a live action director would have to make. Everything from where to put the camera to what the emotional tone of the scene is going to be, in addition to answering all the questions about costume design and weather and color and all the numerous elements that go into making the scene. We're there every step of the way from the very first crude character designs and early storyboards to how loud the footsteps of the Beast should be as he's walking across the marble floor. We shepherd the process from beginning to end.
Kirk Wise, "Interview: 'Beauty and the Beast' Director Kirk Wise", Big Movies Zones, February 2002
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